Blog posts

This page is a library of all my posts ever written on this blog. You will find them in reverse chronological order (from newest to oldest) below.


A critique to school debates (#160)

I was in the audience of my school debate last week. A two hour experience that made me ponder on the extent to which school debates are meaningless. I suggest a better and complete alternative to debates in this post. But first, let me state my observations during my time listening to the debate held at my school. And then the mistakes I think the system embodies. Two observations I. Breakdown:When someone rebutted a statement…

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Because I say so (#159)

“Mom, can I […]?” “No.” “Why?” “Because you can’t.” “But why can’t I?” “Because it isn’t good.” “Why?” “Because I say so.” [Moans with disappointment, accepts defeat.] Because I say so. Impatience usually is the cause of these four words. Sure, one may object saying, “I can’t explain everything to a child. Their understanding is not as high as mine. If I try to explain, there’ll be an infinite regress of “why” questions. Therefore, it’s…

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16 years of being alive (#158)

I turn 16 today. Here are some ideas (and questions) on my mind: 1. Are you going to wait for death to enjoy life too? 2. Tomorrow is simply a bonus. 3. Why do we choose to stay in a bad place when reason can easily get us out of it? 4. Some die at 25 yet aren’t buried until they’re 75. 5. Human feeling is beautiful when you understand it. 6. Question authority. 7.…

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The inexplicit nature of norms & why we sit down to eat (#157)

“Why do we sit down and eat?” that was the question that (completely randomly) popped up in my head and I asked my 9 year old sister what she thought about it. That’s a foolish question at first glance, isn’t it? And one would probably nudge that question away due to it’s apparent silly nature. Unless, what if it isn’t and you shouldn’t nudge answering it away? In some cultures, they sit on the floor…

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The world in 2072 (#156)

AD 2072, The World. People have had many understandings of the laws of the Universe in the past. They weren’t all labeled understandings of the ‘laws of the Universe’ but essentially suggested what we mean by them—that is, the rules that the Universe obeys in all its workings and how it exists. In some societies however, people liked to believe what they knew (perhaps because God had told them or it was God that they…

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Acta non verba: the illusion of hypocrisy (#155)

A couple years ago I was at a spiritual place where I was starting to understand that a lot of things in the world were really messed up. The path most people unconsciously seemed to follow (birth, going to school, striving for grades, entering college, finding a job, climbing up the corporate ladder, marriage, work, work, having kids, work, watching kids grow up, retirement, realizing all the time wasted, death) the idea of that path…

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Craving for explanations (#154)

“Is there is a meaning of life?” Many people naturally ponder on the meaning of life question. As humans who are thirsty to understand the world, we crave explanations for our existence. What’s the purpose of life, we ask? Why did the Universe happen? What does it all mean? We want to make sense of the things around us. So we create stories. That’s how we create all our knowledge. Knowledge does but consist of…

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Whoa moment: on another level of consciousness (#153)

“… once in a while, when you deeply reflect on one of these facts [about the size & age of the Universe], or when you’re in the right late night conversation with the right person, or when you’re staring at the stars, or when you think too hard about what death actually means—you have a Whoa moment.” Tim Urban (Wait But Why) When I first read Tim Urban describe what he calls a Whoa moment, I felt…

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Being Doraemon’s Innovator (#152)

Just so we’re on the same page: we all agree that a child’s creativity is one of the most important things to them, right? Also, isn’t watching cartoons and fantasy shows “a waste of time”? A piece of “shocking ghastly junk” to exaggerate with Roald Dahl’s words for those precious little souls? But what if it’s not? What if you could let the child learn, let the child’s imagination sparkle, let them think about important…

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A marathoner’s prejudice against bad weather (#151)

I have a fellow-runner friend who runs the Mumbai Marathon. The race takes place on the third Sunday of January each year. Coincidentally, in this zone of the world, that is the last bit of winter we get to experience each season. My friend thinks that it’s all—literally—cool until the race but just on the day of the marathon it gets scorching hot (if you don’t know about running, it’s not a fun thing to…

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Under a different light & magnitude (#150)

“We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born. The potential people who could have been here in my place but who will in fact never see the light of day outnumber the sand grains of Arabia. Certainly those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We know this because the set of…

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Learnings to Unlearn (#149)

Unlearning is the new meta-skill. Though it doesn’t get as much attention as it deserves. You can’t really learn evolution without unlearning creationism (the idea that the Universe was created by a supernatural power). You can’t really learn quantum theory without unlearning that the laws of physics must deal with only those things large enough for us to be able to perceive. [1] “All growth requires loss. A loss of your old values, your own…

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Nullius in verba (#148)

It’s easy to accept the most irrational ideas when one doesn’t give them any thought and blindly accepts them because they’re the most obvious ones. It isn’t natural to humans to question their own tightly held beliefs or those of authority (whom they can’t conceive of doubting). And since we’re wired in a way to unknowingly accept deep theories about how the world works according to our environment, most of us have quite an erroneous…

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Parenting Misconceptions: shared by a kid (#147)

Human biology and evolution favor us in the ease of the process of procreating children but it doesn’t make the job of raising them easy in any way. That’s one reason why parents have such a hard time raising a child. It isn’t instinctive to us like copulation seems to be. One may doubt this subject I aim to address as beyond my area of expertise. After all, I’m a fifteen year old kid. How…

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Distortion caused by recent events (#146)

History and it’s key insights have a tendency to get distorted in our minds due to the recent record. Reasoning in such a way so as to come to a conclusion that what’s going to happen in the future is merely a product of what’s happening in the world right now (or has happened in the recent past and continues till date) is a weak and faulty way to reason; nevertheless humans are tended toward…

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What’s wrong with teenagers? (#145)

A teenager’s rant on the problem with the normal teenager. When a child becomes a teenager, all of a sudden he’s into the “real world” now. And I feel that’s a really gloomy imaginative world to be in. In the last years of high school, everybody becomes extremely serious about their career and what they’re going to do in life. They literally write examinations as if their life depends on it (and it actually does,…

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Douglas Adams On Religion (#144)

The following is an excerpt from a speech by Douglas Adams on the troubles on speaking against religion in free society. One can openly share their perspective on the best economic system and their political views but it seems sharing their take on religion (if they’re atheist) is extremely unethical. Richard Dawkins quoted the excerpt in his TED Talk ‘Militant atheism’ (another must-watch) which can be viewed here. Please enjoy, in Douglas’ own words; the…

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The x Rule: Faster than Normal (#143)

(Pronounced: the times rule) A simple rule I follow allows me to learn (and essentially live) up to 2x faster than one would normally do. Here’s how one can employ it to do the same. I listen to all my audiobooks and podcasts at 1.25x speed. And I watch the videos of online courses I take (and other YouTube videos) at anywhere between 1.5 – 2x the normal speed (captions really help here). Also, I…

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Why we are the biggest threat (#142)

In the previous post, I started with a bold conjecture. I wrote: The biggest threat to humanity is itself. This is because I think it’s true if we take absolute accountability for our species. Climate change is something (maybe) we have accelerated. And it’s because of us that Earth is getting inhospitable. So if the biggest threat to humanity is climate change, it’s actually still us. But what about things that aren’t in our control…

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Wars are dumb (#141)

The biggest threat to humanity is itself. I don’t know a lot about what’s going on between Russia and Ukraine right now. This short post doesn’t delve into the details, though it teaches a good lesson. Humans have war-like characteristics. We tend to not stand people who aren’t like us. Vladimir Putin may have his reasons. According to him, his actions are justified. And that’s fine because a lot of things can be justified when…

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An Unconventional View of Happiness (#140)

Most people and standard definitions associate happiness to a feeling of pleasure and joy. I don’t find that view very compelling. So I’m going to propose an unconventional (and hopefully more promising) view of happiness here. Since this is a relative subject, you don’t have to agree with me or even listen to me. But just hear me out. The Problem #1: Equating happiness to pleasure “Pleasure may come from illusion, but happiness can come…

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Lessons from A Shower (#139)

Observation I took cold showers almost every morning throughout the entire winter. Very rarely would I take a hot shower either for the sake of pleasure or when I was sick. But the contrast in these two kinds of showers is tremendous. Especially after taking the shower. Although ironical, you feel warmer after a cold shower than a hot shower when it’s cool outside. My theory is: this happens because your body is cold after…

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The Challenge of Obstacles (#138)

A lot of what we talk about on this blog is to do with how we look at certain things. The perspective from which we are viewing the world. And how is that vision advantageous in accordance with our biggest goals. You’re sure to tumble across obstacles in your life. Maybe you’re facing one right now. Do you let your obstacles drag you down or excite you to play harder? In reality obstacles don’t have…

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2 Ways to be Rational to Better Understand the World (#137)

In the previous post we discussed problems faced because of the dual nature of the mind: The tendency for the conscious self to surf over to the irrational (or Fear) condition. This post continues with showing 2 ways to stay more on the rational side in making important decisions and keeping useful beliefs. Without further ado, here are the 2 effective methods: #1 Break away from the belief “When the facts change, I change my…

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On the inability to do the right thing (#136)

It’s a painful fact that we’re so often aware of the right thing to do, and we know what we want to do, yet we do not do it! Sin #1 The day before, on my run I came across a man on the side of the street, sitting in a crouched position, hands on his head which was looking down. There was roughly nobody on the street as is often the case on an…

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Battle Between Emotion & Rationale (#135)

There’s two ways we think: (1) with emotion and (2) with rationale. They both work together but often fight against each other due to the immense differences in their goals. Emotion’s goal is alerting the body in order to survive and reproduce. The primitive instinct that effects fear and anger among others. Rationale’s goal is to understand the truth (however painful that may be to emotion). Emotion acts instinctively. It’s fast and the default system…

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Is Money Evil? (#134)

This is part two of the 2-part money series on this blog. You can read part one here where we discussed what makes people believe in money and how it works. No, money isn’t evil. The same way a knife isn’t evil but the murderer is (depending on your definition of evil). Money is a tool. It can be used any way we like. It depends on us whether we use the knife to cut…

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Money & Why We Trust Each Other (#133)

Why do we believe in money? Why would people take jobs they’re really not quite interested in and work the majority of their life only to get money out of it? Why have we given so much importance to money? And how does it work in the first place? Let’s try answering these pressing questions. Money has become such a huge part of our lives that we often take its innovation for granted. Without money,…

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The Irrationality of Emotion (#132)

Some stats… Between 33 and 40 per cent of all people experience some form of anxiety when it comes to flying. And between 2.5 per cent and 5 per cent of the population have crippling anxiety, a genuine fear of flying that needs to be classified as a clinical phobia. [1] Some more stats… The odds of dying in a plane crash due to a fatal accident is about 1 in 200,000. An almost zero…

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The Secrets of Life (#131)

Last week marked 15 years since the first time Steve Jobs showed the iPhone to the world. In honor of that here’s a short remark he made about the secrets of life in an interview done by the Santa Clara Valley Historical Association. [1]This is one of the best secrets of life I’ve ever heard. “So, the thing I would say is, when you grow up, you tend to get told that the world is…

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History of Racism (#130)

This post was originally created for the newsletter subscribers. You can subscribe or learn more here. This is a theory of how discrimination against African Americans came to be what it is today. It began with the Europeans. They had to bring in African slaves to work in the sugar plantation fields. Why did they bring in African slaves? (this is a very important question)– Europeans could have brought slaves from anywhere, from Europe or America…

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Why We Are All So Different (#129)

The world is so diverse. Some people we like, some we dislike, some we find cool, some are weird. And the people we have feelings toward similarly have feelings toward the rest of the world (just like we do). Why is it that the same event can cause so different reactions between two human beings? Why does one justify something that is downright wrong to another? Why do we think some people are weird? Why…

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How we always keep our prides high (#128)

Sports fans that root for their hometown team unconsciously use a subtle way to always keep their identity high regarded. This is how we they do it: When their home team wins, they say, “We beat them 3-0!”. When their hometown/favorite team loses, they say, “They [speaker’s hometown team] lost 2-0 that night.”Or, “Yeah, [hometown team name] lost that match pretty bad.” Do you notice the subtle change in language proud fans or hometown members…

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Abundance (#127)

Teenagers today often hear from last generation people that back in those days, we didn’t stare at screens all day, we went outside and did stuff. But if only there were something known as the Internet back in those days, I can assure you that the teenage situation would be pretty much the same as it is today. The reason we crave for sugar goes back to our evolutionary past. Back in the really old…

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Anger & The Hulk (#126)

The Hulk teaches us a lot about anger. He’s good at destroying the enemy when he’s angry, but sometimes that irrational mind goes down the wrong path. When Bruce Banner is subjected to a certain level of emotional stress (at or against his will) he turns into the Hulk. The Hulk can smash. And that’s a good trait to have as an Avenger who faces lots of bad guys very commonly. But the Hulk doesn’t…

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How to Make 2022 The Year For You (#125)

The New Year is the perfect excuse to start working out, read books, keep a journal, learn a new skill, and stuff like that. Although, if only we were as pumped up and in a celebratory mood for each new day as we are for every new year on New Year’s Eve… the world would be so radically different.(By “pumped up and in a celebratory mood”, I don’t mean partying madly. Rather, the sense of…

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The Compound Effect Book Summary (#124)

Notes from Darren Hardy’s book The Compound Effect.This is a combination of quotes directly from the book with certain adjustments for context, as well as my personal thoughts. What is the compound effect? The Compound Effect is the principle of reaping huge rewards from a series of small, smart choices. The compound effect is the operating system that has been running your life, for better or worse. Small, Smart Choices + Consistency + Time =…

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NO PARALYSIS THROUGH ANALYSIS! (#123)

Oftentimes I get an incredible idea, but send it to waste only because I think about it too much. And sometimes I begin doing something new but get so worked up in the superfluous details that I never really get anything done. Sound relatable? We are guided by two main internal factors:Logic and Emotion. Logic serves you to analyze information and things. A system of reasoning.While emotion is essentially feeling, a conscious feeling due to…

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Fear or Love? (#122)

Are you letting yourself be led by fear or by love? If there’s one thing that stops us from doing what we love, that’s fear. Inaction, and often undesired action; boils down to having insufficient courage. Often the physical obstacles are nothing compared to the ones we have created in our psyche. You’re either led by fear, or love.The reality you need to understand though, is that you’re in control. Nobody else. They may be…

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Keep Room for Uncertainty (#121)

A lot is uncertain.Often, the things that are supposed to go in a way, don’t go so.It’s hard to accept but it remains an outstanding fact that most of the stuff in life is uncertain.The future is malleable. Things aren’t intended to be and stay as they are, as much as you may want them to be so. Things change, people change, circumstances change, our perspectives change. The world is impermanent. And it will always…

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Abundance is Deceiving (#120)

It’s common to see that when we have an abundance of something, we don’t really care too much about it. But when we have a scarcity of something, we dwell too much on it. We complain about having little time, but on the weekends we essentially drain the hours; doing something even we’d probably rather not be doing. All the opportunities to spend time with our loved ones were dismissed back then since we were…

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Lessons from Gary Vaynerchuck in Twelve and a Half (#119)

This post consists of the lessons from and summary of Gary Vaynerchuck’s book: Twelve and a Half : Leveraging the Emotional Ingredients Necessary for Business Success. In the book, Gary Vaynerchuck shares 12 necessary “emotional ingredients”, which are essentially emotional skills, integral to have led to his success and happiness in life and business. The “half” is another emotional ingredient Gary is weakest at. The Twelve Necessary Emotional Ingredients Gratitude: Don’t forget—over half the world…

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Data Privacy in Technology is a Joke (#118)

This article is supposed to be a joke. Its not a direct accusation to Apple (I love that company), but it points the finger to every technology company that has bad data privacy of its users and it also condemns the user for using technologies where their privacy is essentially a joke. End of disclaimer. When you say “Hey Siri” or “OK Google” (given your device is near you) your virtual smart device assistant pops…

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How to Start Something New Out (#117)

I mention “Monkey Mind” quite throughout this article. It constantly seeks instant gratification. It works on instinct and impulse. It thinks through feeling, not logic. We all have it, but with reason we can turn it off.Keep reading, you’ll get it. Do you wish to create / start something new? Or perhaps you are starting out on something new? Maybe a business project, YouTube channel, Blog, a highly new important job, or even raising a…

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Template to Reflect. Review. And Redesign (#116)

This article is a template for a year-end journaling process I share in this article (link – Reflect. Review. Redesign. (#115)). Sorry, but you’ll need to read that before you can understand this. Oh, you’ve read it already? Great! Sorry, carry on, please. Reflect List everything you can recall in each week/fortnight week/month (step 1 below is reflecting on every week, you can change it according to your likeness). Week 1: What did I do…

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Reflect. Review. Redesign. (#115)

2021 is nearing its end. What a year it’s been! The end of the year is the best excuse to Reflect. Review. And Redesign. That’s what we’re going to talk about here. Did you wake up yesterday and consciously look at your calendar and say, “Wait, what? It’s December, already?!”– If it occurred to you that way or not, I don’t really know. But I hear a lot of people (at least with whom I…

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Summary: How to Win Friends & Influence People (#114)

This article is a summary for How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie (one of the greatest best-selling books of all time). Let’s dive in. This book is an action book. For “the great aim of education,” said Herbert Spencer, “is not knowledge but action.” Part One: Fundamental Techniques in Handling People Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive…

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How to Remember What You Read (#113)

“I just sit in my office and read all day.” Warren Buffett Reading books has lately become one of my greatest habits. But only reading them and taking in information isn’t going to help if the books I read don’t show up in my morals and through my actions. We’ll see how we can remember and get the most out of reading in this article. Note: The techniques outlined don’t just go for non-fiction books,…

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Aligning Words With Actions (#112)

Often, we say something, mean something, and we do a whole ‘nother thing, if not completely the opposite of what we had said.When I say “said”, I don’t just mean words spoken by you to your friends, family or general acquaintances. I also mean what you think about, and promise yourself. That counts your dreams, goals, desires, purpose, destiny (whatever you call it). Words are thoughts and what you promise yourself as much as they…

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30 Days of Cold Showers (#111)

My Experience & Why I Don’t Plan to Fall Back to Hot Showers Cold showers have turned into a really hot thing right now, backed by “scientific evidence” said to bring about a lot of health benefits. Countless famous people today and in the past advocated the use of it. Charles Darwin used hydrotherapy, cold immersion to treat his depression. A lot of athletes, actors and performers today are huge fans of taking cold showers…

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On the Shortness of Time (#110)

Lucius Annaeus Seneca the Younger or simply Seneca wrote a moral essay sometime back in 49 AD titled ‘De Brevitate Vitae‘ (‘On the Shortness of Life‘ in English) This article is partly inspired by his Stoic philosophy. The average life lasts for about:630,720 hours. 26,280 days. 3,750 weeks. 864 months. 7.2 decades.72 years. If you get 8 hours of sleep every night, the average awake life runs down to two-thirds of all the above numbers. That…

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Becoming Curious (#109)

Step 1. Awareness Children are fast learners. Quite faster than the average adult. They pick up how to speak and learn their first language in no time. Whereas, an adult who knows how to speak already would take a considerably longer time to learn a new language than a newborn human baby. Not only in speech and articulation but it is also observed that children learn a wide range of skills really fast. Think about…

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Mental Links (#108)

Note: mental links, mental models, mental connections, heuristics and systems thinking; all roughly mean the same in psychology. I’ll use the term “mental links” throughout this article. Our minds are incredible at linking and connecting things. Mental links are responsible for how we make sense of the world. We simplify complexities, and find similarities through mental links. Our minds are powerful at making these sorts of links. But we ought to understand and create better…

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A father who (accidently) shot his own kid (#107)

It was November 1994. Fourteen-year-old Matilda, practically for a joke, was playing the role of burglar at home with her friend Stacy. Her father, coming home late, who assumed Matilda was at a friend’s house thought a real burglar may have broken in. He heard noises as he entered his house.For the safety of his wife (also with him) as well as his own, he pulled out his .357 caliber pistol and went into Matilda’s…

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Blaming People for Your Loss is NOT cool (#106)

How often do we judge others (almost unconsciously) when the other person hasn’t done any wrong? How often do we criticize when we really need to apologize? How often do we look for loopholes or fake alibi to save our own ego, instead of the truth? How often do we accuse when we are the ones to be accused and held accountable? Quite often, I imagine. “When you blame and criticize others you are avoiding…

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Left Brain + Right Brain Thinking (#105)

The human brain is a subtly brilliant thing. Its capacities and intriguing manners literally amaze me every day—to this day! Its immense size is wonderful. Its complexity is breathtaking. Everything about it is just so awesome!It also seems better though in its original form when we accumulate and generalize it as one piece. Allow me to explain. Left Brain/Right Brain We’re all (hopefully) acquainted with the left brain/right brain theory. The idea that there are…

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Is Reality Relative? (#104)

17 years ago the city council in Monza, Italy (famous for its Formula 1 Grand Prix) prohibited pet owners from keeping their goldfish in bowls (like the one in the picture above). Here’s part of what the measure’s sponsor said, “The ruling is intended to transmit a message about the correct treatment of domestic animals. A fish kept in a bowl has a distorted view of reality and suffers because of this…“ “Distorted view of…

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Build People (#103)

People may forget what you say and people may forget what you do. But no one will ever forget how you made them feel Maya Angelou Read the above quote once again, if you please, and this time try noticing how your thoughts shoot up when you understand the words of Maya Angelou better. So, how did you observe that quote? Okay, let me be a little more specific … What were your thoughts on…

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Evolution of the brain (#102)

Everything we do, every thought we’ve ever had, is produced by the human brain. But exactly how it operates remains one of the biggest unsolved mysteries, and it seems the more we probe its secrets, the more surprises we find. Neil deGrasse Tyson The other day in biology class while we were studying something about the brain, I wondered, how on earth did the human brain even evolve? We know that the human brain has…

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Big Mind, small mind (#101)

A popular idea in the Zen tradition—Big Mind, small mind—sets out to explain two different, and extreme perspectives of looking at the world. One is looking at everything from the cosmic scale, aka the Big Picture, broad view mind-set. Most astronauts undergo a profound cognitive shift when they observe the home planet from space for the very first time. It’s famously known as the overview effect. Looking at the whole of Earth in one view,…

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100

Today and this post together mark day and article #100 on this blog. The enthusiasm and desire to write everyday and share it with a delightful audience through this blog still reside sincerely in my heart, perhaps now more than ever. Since day 1 I’ve tried writing the best I can, learning and growing along the way. We’ve explored a wide array of subjects ranging from philosophy, happiness, learning and life to human psychology, curiosity,…

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099 The Resistance (at first)

“It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.”  Leonardo da Vinci The mind is eminent for its resistance. We occasionally experience resistance even to doing things that we deep-down really want to do. And that’s strange, isn’t it? Although; I completely agree with what the great polymath Da Vinci observed on resistance. It really is easier to resist doing something at the beginning—or before even getting started—than it is for the…

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098 Think Week

I read and think. Warren Buffett Bill Gates has revealed an important practice which helped him think very well during the early years at Microsoft. Twice a year, Gates would take a 7 day Think Week. He would go to a secluded location in Hood Canal, Washington with stacks of important papers and books. He would cut off all communication with family, friends, co-workers and employees—basically he would be secluded from the entire world except…

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097 Fear

Fear always screams loudest when your magic is closest Robin Sharma (EHM) Fear protected us (as it still does, but to a different extent). It was quite important at the time for our homo Sapiens species, when they were hunter-gatherers living in the wild, hunting for prey every afternoon, to feel fear. Let’s just say, if humans back then didn’t have a biological phenomenon called the fight or flight response, we wouldn’t have evolved into…

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096 Breaking the Chain

 Vicious cycles. They’re rather deadly. And you don’t want to be stuck in one. I think one of the finest parts about experiencing life is all the differences, all the amazingly vast and diverse stuff on our planet (and beyond!). There are so many different people and a limitless amount of diverse things we can get to know of, and learn from. All the incredible stuff here, which make up life on our small…

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095 Reflection on this blog

As I begin writing my 95th article of this blog (with many more to come!), I feel a little reflective today.I had a simple intention with my article writings, which I still follow. Ever since COVID-19 hit, the longer we were told to “stay at home”, the closer I shifted towards a “spiritual awakening” of some sorts. Everyday I would try all these new things and learn a bunch; about myself and the wonderful way…

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094 Turning difficult into fun

There’s something unsurprisingly odd about doing “fun stuff” that we would even go the extra mile to do it. Here is a video I found on Twitter which depicts more clearly, through a public experiment, the meaning of my statement. In the video: The creators of the whole video wanted to see if they could get more people to choose the stairs (rather than the escalator) by making the stairs more “fun” to climb.So, they…

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093 Creating good ways to live

Our entire lives are basically a series of habits. We do things habitually for the bulk of our time on this planet. But habits can turn into our worst enemies sometimes, and worst enemies do everything they can to forbid us to live our best. In order to prosper one needs to avoid accumulating enemies, in the habitual sense. We could outweigh the evil by increasing the good. To increase the good, it is indeed…

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092 The fisherman and the businessman

Here is a great Brazilian Classic story, about a fisherman and a businessman. I found it really relatable and I hope you like it too. Note: this article was originally published on Paulo Coelho’s blog post. The fisherman and the businessman There was once a businessman who was sitting by the beach in a small Brazilian village. As he sat, he saw a Brazilian fisherman rowing a small boat towards the shore having caught quite…

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091 Why I read

Reading books has recently become one of my many favorite things to do. I read everyday for a number of reasons (highlighted further below in this article). I made a goal of reading 25 books from cover to cover this year and I’m presently just one short of that big number, on my 25th book of the year. That means I’ll be quite able to surpass my reading goal of 2021 by a good margin.…

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090 Knowledge and TMI

Here’s the thing. We make stuff seem really complicated. Like really, really complicated. The two key words in the above phrase are make and seem. We live in a time where people tend to get vanquished by “information overload“. You’ve surely heard those two words together before. Information overload or TMI (Too Much Information). There’s just so much stuff for our brains to get attracted on to. We get bits and chunks of details, nudges,…

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089 The flow state zone and running

In a past article, I wrote about something known as the flow state. To explain it in rather pretentious terms, a flow state is an intense, yet a passively relaxing state of mind where you have an extreme sense of clarity and you are able to do whatever it is you want to do with the highest level of focus on the work and therefore extreme fruitfulness of performing the action. I also proposed a “profitable technique”…

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088 Running out of time?

You’ll find two kinds of clichéd “motivational” advice given by “successful people” out there. One side says you have all the time in the world. Your life is just getting started. Be patient and trust the process. And the other says you’re running out of time. You need to have a very strong sense of urgency. You need to win today, let’s go! Let’s go! Let’s go! Both of these so-called successful people advice is…

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087 The brain doesn’t multi-task well

“Find what you’re good at. Whatever it is, and become excellent at it. Lauren Rowe Okay, so the brain isn’t that good at multi-tasking. In fact it isn’t good at all. The human brain isn’t “fit” to multi-task. No matter how great we think we are at doing multiple stuff at once. It just doesn’t work. Or it eventually may “work” but when all comes to an end, you discover for yourself that all that…

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086 Why I’m learning a different language

Today is special. It marks day-100 on my journey of becoming a Spanish speaker. Just a hundred days ago, I started all the way from scratch. I only knew one word, “hola”. I was sure to persevere in my study of the language though. I knew I wouldn’t quit. Not before learning the whole language. There wasn’t really any serious reason for me to want to learn the language, if viewed from inherent observation. I…

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085 A kid’s perspective on diversity and inclusion

It feels great to see more and more people and large organizations take giant leaps forward in making the world a more diversely thriving place. We’re all, as a species finally beginning to see the effects of having different people with their valuable distinct perspectives to work and be friends with, and that’s amazing! To put it simply, there are two reasons to diversify, from two different ways of thinking. The first is the rationalist…

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084 The Not-To-Do List

Do you easily get overwhelmed by the number of tasks on your to-do list? Do you struggle to make ends meet with all the “stuff” you need to do in a day? Do you go to bed at night with overdue tasks? If yes (or really even if you answered no), I think you could be better off by creating a Not-To-Do List. The not-to-do list is really a simple thing. And it’s exactly what…

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083 Science-Fiction inspires, not predicts

The immense, limitless potential of human imagination is amazing, just to put it softly. The ability to see what there isn’t is an innate trait to humans and it’s what makes us so different and so much more intelligent than all other organisms on Earth. Imagination and thinking has forever sparked our race’s creativity by making us form a picture of what there really isn’t and then transforming that imagined reality into objective reality. Often,…

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082 Three phases of ideas & Moore’s law

Science-fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke once wrote a summed-up proposition about the 3 phases “every revolutionary idea” passes through (before it becomes what it is destined to become; revolutionary). The three stages every new revolutionary idea passes through according to the great Sci-Fi writer are: It’s completely impossible. It’s possible, but it’s not worth doing. I said it was a good idea all along. This kind of funny thinking has taken place quite a lot…

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081 But it’s never been done before

Christopher Columbus, Sir Isaac Newton, Orville and Wilbur Wright, Thomas Edison, Edmund Hillary, Yuri  Gagarin, Neil Armstrong, Marie Curie, Mahatma Gandhi, Nancy Pelosi, Barack Obama, Roger Bannister, Eliud Kipchoge, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk. These brilliant names are just a fraction of a fraction of the wonderful women and men who were the firsts in some field or the other and who forever changed the world by inspiring others to follow suit. They were and always…

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080 Gratification

Being the species we are, it’s not really easily grasped by us that all our actions are driven through the motivations of our basic needs. It’s a very complex system of motivation and reward, and includes a lot of deep dendritic paths but they all meet at the main node of the few basic things we really need as a human genus. In simple terms, all action is the effect of the motivating factor of…

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079 Extreme Classification Proneness

Our proneness to characterize and categorize things to the extreme spectrum is what I like to term the “Extreme Classification Proneness”. We easily make blunders during categorizing things, people, places and the vast stuff which makes up the world. This happens because our basis on the categories are not apt. We quite often do this on the extremes, saying “this is good” therefore “that is bad”. Or “this is right” so “that is wrong”. Q.E.D.…

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078 What is Burnout?

Burned out. We’ve been hearing that a lot relatively lately. People ranging from the 9-5 job category to famous YouTubers, celebrities, singers, and those “following their ambition” have shared about their perspective on burnout or have been burned out themselves. Whether you have a schedule that has the power to get filled up by others, or you have your own prioritized and ambitious one, you have a chance to get burned out. As mental health…

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077 How to stop checking your phone all the time

You probably know this but I’ll say it anyway: On average people spend 2 hours of their day on social media apps alone. And we check our phones like 58 times a day. But averages can be deceiving – some might be using social media for 4-6 hours a day which is 1/6th to 1/4th of a whole 24 hour day or some might not be using those attention span consuming apps at all. But…

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076 Why I run

* This article is the second of the “Why I” series – where I simply share about why I do a certain thing. “066 Why I write” was the first article in this series. For some context first: I deem myself a long distance runner who runs 5-6 days averaging 50+ kilometers (31 + miles) a week. And my farthest run ever recorded has been 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) (at the time of writing)That’s good…

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075 Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Never Stopped

A politician, legal scholar, military commander, lawyer, banker, economist, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation’s financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper. First secretary of the treasury, writer of The Federalist papers, a poor immigrant, an illegitimate son, died in a duel with the vice-president (at that time), who had all of these…

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074 Following every curiosity

You never know where one small curiosity can lead you to. Something that I believe is collectively the most incredible thing we can all do, or at least attempt to do is to follow every curiosity that arises along our path. I do in most cases heed to my own liking of “following every curiosity” and it always feels amazing. I had a curious desire to start sharing my ideas once, so I started a…

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073 Life isn’t all that serious

It seems we have a natural tendency toward making mountains out of molehills. When some “stuff” is viewed from our inherent perspectives, it appears to be so big and impactful. We say that our whole life depends on that one thing. Well, theoretically, no- it doesn’t, life depends on oxygen and a little bit of food which you can scrap up anyway. But when that “stuff” is really viewed from the whole life, bigger picture…

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072 Originality makes you a professional

We live in a world where people are constantly trying to “get better”. We want to become so-called professionals, or grandmasters if you like. And luckily or not, it has never been a greater time in history to be able to imitate the actions of people already in the world who are considered “professionals”. We live in the influential era. We hear famous athletes giving their inspiring speeches about hard work and mental power. Influencers…

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071 Motivation is overrated

Have you ever watched some “motivational video” and just felt the adrenaline flow through your veins? Perhaps you even get up after watching it and land some push-ups on the ground just like the ripped guy on YouTube you saw do a few seconds ago, talking about “HARD WORK” and “NO EXCUSES”. Or some other external motivation like the New Year coming around made you make a decision (one which would be very regretful later)…

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070 Why we never have enough time

“It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it Seneca Time is something that I think many people can agree on being one of the most important elements of life. We say from time to time, “I don’t have any time for that.”, “I’m busy.”, “I have another meeting in 2 minutes.” or “I never have enough time.” It feels as though our entire lives…

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069 I’m afraid of peaches

Okay, this may sound weird and very strange but I’m sort of afraid of peaches. All of this started when I was on my morning run like last week, and completely out of nowhere, my mind sent me a signal of me eating a peach. Biting it wholly. And just the sensation was making me so uncomfortable! The furry, fuzzy and ambiguous skin of the peach was making me ticklish and providing a feeling which…

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068 Inspiration4

Richard Branson launched into space on 11 July, 2021. Just 9 days later on 20 July, Jeff Bezos went to space on his rocket. These were incredible achievements. Truly amazing giant leaps in space exploration in the private sector.But yesterday, 16 September, 2021, 2 months or so after the two billionaires went to space in their own spaceships and rockets of their own space companies, SpaceX made history by launching 4 civilians (NOT astronauts) into…

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067 Aliens?

* This article is beyond what I usually talk about but I felt I could share about this subject here since my curiosity about space is like another part of me. And my recent learning process on astrobiology and other topics related to space exploration allow me to talk about what stand I keep on space exploration and SETI (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) in an easy-to-understand manner. First things first, SETI (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence)…

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066 Why I write

* This is the first out of many “Why I” articles to come as I plan to create a “Why I” article series where basically I’ll talk about why I do a certain thing. And I thought it’d be cool to kick it off with addressing the subject “why I write”. Okay, let’s do this! I’ve felt quite strongly recently that I am able to communicate my perspectives very precisely and just the way I…

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065 Why chasing almost never works

Chasing is great! And being able to chase things down is a really good trait to be acquired with in today’s world—and as it really always has been. To be clear: this is about our hunter-gatherer ancestors who had to hunt food everyday or rather “chase” food to survive. So, just like that, we need to chase down certain “things” if you like, and delay gratification to survive. But. It gets as simple as this:…

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064 It’s hard either way

We’ve all probably heard someone say, “Life is hard” and at some point in our lives, we’ve all probably even experienced life’s hardness and it’s unwanted challenges thrown across our paths which make us feel like a failure or just unhappy. You see I think that life is what life is, and rather more importantly it is what we make life out to be. People who “chase their dreams” and “follow their passion” instead of…

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063 Kid’s stress level=Adult’s stress level

You know what. Life’s hard. Whatever you do. But life is also amazing. And we feel moments of pleasure from time to time. I’m one of a kind who believes that children, like literally even toddlers have the same stress levels as the most accountable adults in today’s society or just adults with a family responsibility. You may not believe me, and may not even want to listen to me anymore. But just hear me…

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062 What life is really “all” about

You inevitably may have heard people say “Life is all about …”They say things like:“Life is all about happiness““Life is all about freedom““Life is all about the next step““Life is all about getting back up““Life is all about this moment““Life is all about purpose““Life is all about balance“And many others… But well, it always sort of provoked me, because if life is all about one thing, how can it ever be all about so many…

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061 Why Human tendency intrigues me

I’ve always been somewhat greatly intrigued by the intricate ways of human thinking. In particular the concept of human bias, perspective, and human error in ways of perceiving the world, attract me greatly. And in the last couple of weeks or so, my curiosity for them has intensified and in turn made me desirous to learn more about the subject of human psychology (if you’ve been reading my recent articles, you’ll know how much I’ve…

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